They need you in the office but you like working from home. Now what?

Pictured: woman with her feet up on her desk at home

They need you in the office but you like working from home. Now what?

March 28, 2022

Pictured: woman with her feet up on her desk at homeAt first, the idea of working from home made a lot of employees uncomfortable.

They worried about feeling isolated and about being distracted or unable to focus. They didn’t have their homes set up with a space to work and with the entire family home all the time, it probably felt like chaos.

Two years later, they’ve figured out how to make it work and have settled in. They’ve learned to like it!

And now, companies are making decisions around bringing their employees back into the office. They need to decide if they will continue to have employees work remotely, move to a hybrid model, or have everyone fully return to the office.

As they make this decision, companies are trying to balance the wants of their employees and the needs of their business. They need to be profitable and competitive with productive employees, and they also need to make sure their employees are happy.

There is no one simple answer. Every company has unique needs so the solution will be unique to them. And every job is different. Some require face-to-face interaction while others work perfectly well in a remote environment

What I want to focus on here is how employees are responding to the prospect of going back into the office.

This is what I’m hearing from my own clients:

  • I don’t want to commute. I’ve saved money by staying home and I don’t want the hassle with the traffic.
  • I like working in my sweatpants!
  • I’ve saved so much time by not having to get dressed and pulled together for work.
  • I don’t want to spend my money on new clothes for the office.
  • I like the flexibility that working from home gives me. Going to the office means I won’t be able to take a quick nap after lunch.
  • I do my exercises at lunch, and I won’t be able to do that if I go back to the office
  • I am more productive working from home.

I feel the need to point out that the last point above about productivity is the one that companies are going to be most interested in! Your productivity serves their business needs… but so does your happiness.

On the flip side, I do have some clients who have already gone back to their office. They’re happy to see their colleagues but they find it disruptive. They tell me they can’t get their work done.

It is to the benefit of the company that its employees see each other in less formal “watercooler” settings, and it’s to your benefit as well. These casual meetups are opportunities for spur-of-the-moment brainstorming sessions, spontaneous sharing of ideas, and for networking.

When we work remotely, those casual meet-ups with our colleagues don’t happen. Every interaction is planned. That means that both you and your company miss out.

As your call to return to the office looms, I invite you to think about this from your company’s perspective.

Remember, companies are in business to make money, be profitable, remain competitive, and grow. If they don’t do all these things, then you might not have a job to go back to the office for.

With all of this in mind, the question is: How can both your company’s needs and your wants be met?

You have your list of wants (and perhaps, a resistance to change when you’ve just finally settled in), and your company has business needs.

How can you use this information to create a solution where everyone benefits?

This is about incorporating your wants with the company’s needs. If you can think about things from their perspective, you may find a way to incorporate what you want so that it fits within their needs.

If this is of interest to you, I invite you to take the following steps.

  1. On a piece of paper, create two columns.
    - In the first column, write out all the things you want.
    - In the second column, write out how the company benefits from what you want.
  2. On another page, write out your accomplishments from the past year along with the results of those activities, especially in terms of how the company has benefited.
  3. Then, have a conversation with your manager. Let them know that you want to support them during this time of transition. Take the opportunity to share what you want, and frame it with a focus on how your wants benefit the company.

I’m hoping these steps will open up your perspective. What you want is important! But if they don’t serve the company then it may not be feasible, and it’s important that you get clear on this!

You are an integral part of your company’s success. They want to keep you!

Work towards a solution where everyone benefits; the company will be profitable, growing, and competitive and you will be happy as well.

Where do you want to go in your career?

Use this guide to create your own career path. You can choose your own adventure.

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Getting Comfortable With Small Talk

5 business people talking and looking uncomfortable

Getting Comfortable With Small Talk

March 14, 2022

5 business people talking and looking uncomfortableAre you comfortable with small talk? I’m not a fan of small talk, and I’ve noticed that many people struggle with it.

The thing is, we can’t avoid small talk. It’s an inherent part of how we communicate, even if we hate it.

The answer to our discomfort with small talk is to understand its purpose so that we can leverage it to have the deeper conversations that we seek, and to develop new relationships.

So, what is the purpose of small talk?

It leads to deeper conversation and opportunities that you might not have had prior to what feels like an unimportant conversation that’s going nowhere.

If small talk is so important, why do we struggle so much with it?

For one, I don’t think we realize what purpose small talk plays, so it’s easy to discount it.

That’s the big misconception: We tend to think that small talk is unimportant and something we just have to endure. But small talk IS important! It is leading us to a rich opportunity.

When we engage in small talk, we’re working with our conversational partners to create a connection and get on the same page. It may just feel like chatter, but it can lead us into deeper conversation and it can serve as the beginning of a relationship with the other person.

And for another…it just plain makes us uncomfortable! We spend a lot of our time during small talk thinking things like:

  • “What do I say?”
  • “What if I say something wrong?”
  • “Why is this matter? It doesn’t sound important.”
  • “What do they think of me?”
  • “Is this going anywhere?”
  • “Is this worth my time? Should I be someplace else…?”

These concerns are normal. The realm of small talk is a vague, uncertain space where we’re all just trying to find some solid ground.

To help you (and your conversational partner) have a better small talk experience, I’d like to offer three suggestions that can make it less uncomfortable and also get you into the deeper conversation faster:

  1. Say their name a few different times. The most powerful word for any of us is our own name. It gives them an amazingly positive feeling and it will help you leave a positive impression. It also helps you remember their name for your next conversation with them.
  2. Give them a compliment. Whether you say you like their name, the color of a piece of clothing they are wearing, or are impressed by something they’ve accomplished, a compliment is another way to leave a positive impression. On top of that is the fact that they have the same concerns that you do. They’re thinking, “What if I say something wrong?” and “What does this person think of me?” Giving them a compliment eases these concerns, enabling the conversation to move more smoothly into deeper territory.
  3. Think of small talk as less about talking and more about listening. This is your opportunity to get to know the other person better. Bonus: When you ask your conversational partner questions that invite them to talk longer, you start moving beyond small talk and into the rich, deeper stuff.

I think the most important thing about small talk that we need to remember is that we are not the only ones who are uncomfortable with it. Most people are! But if we can be strategic about how we engage with that initial part of a conversation, we can get a lot more out of where it’s leading… deeper conversation and building great relationships that serve us.

Are you ready to move beyond small talk into building a professional relationship?

Use this step-by-step guide to easily engage in smoother conversation and improve your confidence.

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The Career-Growth Gender Gap: It’s still here but we’ve got plans

women can take action to change the career-growth gender gap

The Career-Growth Gender Gap: It’s still here but we’ve got plans

November 22, 2021

women can take action to change the career-growth gender gapIf you are a woman and early in your career path, there’s something you need to know:

Women face challenges in their career growth that men do not.

If you think that we’re beyond the gender problem, I invite you to think again… because we are not!

In fact, women face TWO specific challenges:

First - Women don’t move up to the next level within their first five years at the same pace as men

Second - Because they don’t get promoted, women do not develop the same leadership skills as men within this same time frame.

These two steps are essential for career growth!

Researchers call this the “broken rung.” According to a 2019 study by McKinsey and LeanIn.org, these obstacles that prevent women from progressing in their careers.

Here’s the thing:

If you don’t get promoted, you don’t get into the pipeline for further promotions. Instead, you play a game of catch-up and it’s easy to continue to fall behind.

So… what can you do about this?

As an answer to that question, I’d like to tell you about a wonderful group of early-career professional women that I recently had the wonderful opportunity to speak with.

They were enrolled in a year-long program designed to address these common career-growth challenges that women face in the workplace. These women knew that they had to take control over what they needed and wanted in their careers. They were aware that if they were going to remove the obstacles they faced, they needed to understand the challenges that created them.

As part of their program, these women identified their values around what is important to them in the workplace. With that in mind, I spoke with them about three key areas that build upon what they value in the workplace.

  1. Work boundaries
  2. Confidence
  3. Assertiveness

These are foundational factors that support their values. (If you want to identify your own values with regards to the workplace, download the Corporate Culture worksheet.)

Here’s a quick summary of these key areas and how they support and align with your values:

Work Boundaries reflect how you want to be treated in the workplace. Keep in mind: You should treat others the same way you hope to be treated. Following the Golden Rule can serve a guiding light.

Confidence helps you define and establish your boundaries.

Assertiveness guides you towards using the right language to get your point across clearly and tactfully when your boundaries are threatened or compromised.

What I find most exciting about these key areas is that they are skills. That means you can learn them and practice them so that when you need them, you’ll be ready.

Here is what I’m hoping you’ll take away from this:

  • You have to choose to take control over what you want and need in your career
  • You can take action to combat the challenges you face
  • Finding support through communities and a career coach can help you make these things happen for yourself.

We are still facing gender challenges in the workplace, but we are not victims to them. You can take specific, focused action to support your own career growth. When you do the work, success will follow.

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Need a new job? Start here.

Sign: I quit

Need a new job? Start here.

November 1, 2021

Sign: I quit

You’ve likely heard of the “Great Resignation” a term recently coined by Anthony Klotz, a Management Professor from Texas A&M, who predicted a mass and voluntary exodus from the workforce

Well, it’s happening. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, four million Americans quit their jobs in August 2021, alone. The highest departures are among the 30-45 career professionals with the 20-25 being the second highest.

Employees are leaving for many different reasons.

They are leaving the company. They are disappointed with how the company has treated them during the pandemic. Many companies have focused more on profits than the people who help them make the profits, and now they are facing the consequences.

They are leaving their manager. Even if the company might be great, but their manager has not been supportive or concerned about the impact that COVID has on the mental and physical health of the people they manage.

They are leaving the job. The role they once loved has changed and, with going remote, the responsibilities may have grown while growth opportunities have diminished.

If you have left your job or if you are thinking about doing so, it is essential that you assess the factors that are driving you to leave. The pandemic may have been the catalyst to help you make your decision, but there’s always something deeper going on. Digging into your unique “something deeper” is essential for helping you move forward. If you don’t know the “why” of such a big decision, how will you know if the next job you find is the right one?

To begin understanding your “why,” answer the questions below:

About the company:

  1. What is it like to work there?
  2. What is the culture like?
  3. Looking at your answers to #1 and #2 above: What is a match for who you are and what is not?

About the manager:

  1. How is their management style congruent with how you like to be managed, and how is it not?
  2. In what ways do they support you in your professional development, and how do they not?
  3. How do they care about your overall well-being, and how do they not?

About the job:

  1. When you think back when you were first hired or promoted into the most recent role, why were you excited about it?
  2. What did you hope to learn, and did you learn it?
  3. In what ways do you find your role challenging, rewarding, or demanding… and in what ways do you not?

Your answers to these questions can help you define what you are looking for in your next role.

When we cut to the chase, every theme of the “Great Resignation” points to the fact that employees are leaving their jobs because they are not happy. They want something else that their existing company, job, and manager are not able to provide.

If you have left or are thinking of leaving, make sure you clearly understand your reasons why. Your answers to the questions above will help you create the path to a new position that will fulfill you in the ways that you need.

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Having trouble finding a job? This might be why.

How to find the right job for you

Having trouble finding a job? This might be why.

October 18, 2021

Are you struggling to find a job?

Not just any job… the right job. The job where you’ll be happy, with a company whose culture fits you well, and where you can see yourself staying for the long haul?

You, my friend, are not looking for a job; you’re looking for the next step in your career. And unfortunately, it’s no surprise that you’re struggling.

The process of looking for a job is convoluted and bottlenecked. Almost every job seeker goes to the same big places to post their resume and look for jobs, and almost every company goes to that same place to filter through the chaos in search of that one perfect person who checks all the boxes on their job listing.

Unfortunately, this will stay as it is so long as everyone keeps doing what they’re doing.

I think it’s interesting that both job seekers and companies with job openings all go through this same process over and over, even though it’s convoluted and difficult to work with. I recently wrote an article addressing how companies could do things differently.

I’m wondering… did you know that you have options?

Posting to LinkedIn and the common job boards is just one way to try and find a job. But since most other people use that same process, it’s going to be incredibly difficult (if not impossible) to stand out.

So, what can you do instead? You can tap the hidden job market.

This means you’re going to have to do something active rather than passive.

When you distribute copies of your resume to LinkedIn, job boards, and directly to companies, you’re actually being very passive. It’s a lot like throwing your resume into a huge haystack of resumes and hoping the person reaching in just happens to grab yours.

If you really want the right job, you’re going to have to get active. When you actively job search, the people who have a job opening that fits you will already know about you. They won’t reach into the haystack; instead, they’ll download your resume from their email, or even just pick it up off their desk.

What is the “active” action that will make that happen? You’re going to have to talk to people.

Here’s the thing: The best jobs are found through your network.

It’s ok if you don’t have one yet, or you do but you’ve let it languish. We all need to build our networks, and then we need to maintain them.

If you’re looking for the right job right now, the best thing you can do is reach out to your network. Get connected and stay connected.

If your next question is, “But what do I say?” I’ve got you covered! Here are some of my recent articles that will help you be strategic in how you connect with your network:

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Solve the Hidden Talent Shortage with a New Approach

Solving the Hidden Talent Shortage with a New Approach

Solve the Hidden Talent Shortage with a New Approach

October 4, 2021

Solving the Hidden Talent Shortage with a New ApproachAccording to the Manpower Group, almost 70% of employers report that they cannot find the people with skills they need. (Manpower Group, 2020, The Talent Shortage.) In the U.S., employer intentions to bring on workers is at a ten-year high. (Manpower Group report, Q4 2021)

At the same time, the U.S. unemployment rate was at 5.2 in August 2021.(Bureau of Labor Statistics, September 3, 2021, The Employment Situation – August 2021)

In short: There are jobs available, and there are plenty of people looking for those jobs.

So, what’s the problem? The operative word is “talent.” There are plenty of people who are looking for jobs. But companies struggle to connect with the job seekers who have the right skills and experience to fill the open roles.

I believe this challenge exists because companies are using old ways to find new talent.

Thanks to improved technology and changes that we’ve need to make around the globe to adjust for a global pandemic, the use of video interviews and social media outlets to drive recruiting strategies has increased. But where companies find the talent to interview has not changed.

Until companies start approaching the talent pool from a different direction, finding the right talent to fill open roles will continue to be a challenge.

The strategies for finding talent that companies typically use are no longer working. To get ahead of the trend, companies need to become proactive not reactive in finding talent, and they need to bring in more of a human touch to the process.

There are some nuances to this problem that I want to address: It starts with where companies are looking for talent, but also includes what they are looking for from within the talent pool.

First, companies habitually look for talent when the position is ready to be filled. They open the position and only then do they hit up LinkedIn and other online platforms. They work their way through the pile of unknown talent via resumes from people they’ve not yet met. Bigger companies may even filter those resumes with technology using an Applicant Tracking System (ATS), which removes any sense of the human behind the words.

But what if companies reversed this process?

What if they started with the pool of talent and got to know the people interested in working with them… and at the same time, gave those people an opportunity to get to know the company and its culture better?

What I’m suggesting here is that companies could build their own Hidden Talent Network where they can gather the pool of interested job seekers before the job is open.

This would allow the companies to address the second nuance that I mentioned above: Changing what they are looking for from that talent.

Typically, companies look for ideal candidates who already have everything that is listed on the job description. That means they miss one key factor: the candidate’s potential.

Finding the right person for a job isn’t just about whether they’ve got all the boxes checked. It’s also about their potential to check more boxes as they grow with the company.

Why does this matter? Turnover is expensive!

It can cost a U.S. company $4000 or more to hire one employee, and it can take up to 52 days to fill a position. (Toggl.com) If you hire someone who doesn’t stay, the company starts the process again, losing more money and time in the process.

Therefore, the goal should not be to hire someone who checks all the boxes in the job description; rather, hire someone who has the potential to check those boxes and much more. Hire someone who envisions themselves staying with your company for the long term, and who you already know fits the culture.

Building your own Hidden Talent Network would help you do this. It provides you with a pool of people that you already know, and who have gotten to know your company as well. Before the job is even open, you can identify the people who tick most of the boxes and show potential to grow with your company. You’ll shorten the time to hire and potentially reduce how much money it costs to find them.

So how do you build a Hidden Talent Network? Slowly, over time, by scouting talent and giving the talent the opportunity to scout you.

For example, you could host talent events where you can speak to them in groups about where your company is going. In what ways is it growing and what types of talent do you hope to be looking for in the future? Talk about your organizational culture and what you value. This would also be a great time to set expectations: What can job seekers expect during your hiring process? Which skills and qualifications are mandatory? What can they do to be an even better fit as the anticipated jobs come open?

Transparency on your part will help you find the right people and get the conversations started early.

From all the years that I’ve spent working with job seekers to help them find the right positions that will help them build a career for themselves, the one thing that I’ve consistently seen is that the best jobs are found through the hidden job market.

That “hidden job market” is something that a job seeker builds for themselves by making connections with the companies that they are interested in working with.

Companies could do this as well by making it easier for individuals to connect with them and speeding up the whole job placement experience for everyone involved. It could also provide them with an untapped market of talent that they could onboard quickly.

The world has changed and continues to do so. If companies want to get the best talent, they’ll need to change with it. The global pandemic has made us all more human. Connection matters more to us. The companies that are embracing this humanness are the ones that will find the best people.

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3 Easy Tips to Leave a First and Lasting Impression

How to leave a great first impression

3 Easy Tips to Leave a First and Lasting Impression

September 20, 2021

How to leave a great first impression

I have been working in the career field for over 20 years helping early-, mid-, and late-career professionals in job transition. Networking is always a topic of discussion since it is a key success factor in finding the right job! My goal is to make sure my clients understand how to network effectively and see where they might need some guidance.

I start with my definition of networking, which is: building relationships with people who can provide you with information, advice, and contacts. You want to leave a favorable impression with those you meet so that if they hear about a position that is not published, they will let you know.

It’s important that my clients and I have a mutual understanding of the definition of networking. I’ve noticed that some job seekers think networking is all about them. They tell everyone they are looking for a job and ask everyone to let them know if they hear of any jobs that would be good fit.

That does not sound like building relationships. Rather, it’s a transactional relationship focused on one purpose: Finding a job!

That isn’t how networking operates. It leaves a negative impression because it’s one-sided… all take and no give.

If you want to leave a favorable impression with people you meet, you need to start by focusing on the other person first.

Here are three simple steps to get you started:

Tip #1: Use their name at least 3 times: At the beginning, middle and end of the conversation.

Start by using it as you are introduced: “Jayne, it is a pleasure to meet you. Thank you so much for taking your time to talk to me.” If their name is difficult to pronounce, this is your opportunity to ask: “Can you please pronounce your name again. I want to make sure I am saying it correctly.” This is a very gracious way of respecting them and people always appreciate it.

Mention their name again during your conversation and most importantly, use it at the end: “Jayne, I appreciate your insights today and I intend to follow up with many of your suggestions. Thank you!”

In addition to helping you build a respectful connection with them, you’re almost guaranteed to remember their name in the future because you’ve done the repetitive work to get it into your memory.

Tip #2: Show interest in the other person by asking questions. You can ask them what they do for work and what they like about their job. You can take it even further and ask how and why they entered their field. Invite them to go into a little bit of detail by asking questions like, “Can you tell me a little more about that?” Resist the urge to chime in or comment right away. Use this as an opportunity to practice listening as you give them the space to tell their story before you bring the conversation around to you.

Tip #3:  Follow up twice! First, send them a note of appreciation either by email or with a handwritten note. Mention some of the highlights of the conversation, which will show that you were listening and also remind them of what you talked about.

Then follow up again a couple of weeks later. Perhaps you can send them an article related to something that they mentioned when you first met. You could also give them an update on your job search.

Wait – job search? YES! You do get to tell them about your job search. Just don’t start there, and don’t let that be the only thing you talk about.

When you make it about them, they’ll remember you and be more willing to help you.

Leaving a first and last impression with people you meet might take a bit of effort and awareness on your part. Trusts me… in the end, it is worth it!

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You Don’t Know Where You’re Going but You Can’t Stay Here

What's next?

You Don’t Know Where You’re Going but You Can’t Stay Here

August 23, 2021

What's next?Working from home has either reinforced how much you love what you do or how much you really need to be doing something different… and soon! Many of my clients are telling me: “I am not happy with what I am doing, but I don’t know what I want to do instead!

Welcome to “The Great Resignation,” where so many employees are leaving their jobs for new ones.

How employees were treated by their companies during Covid brought about a heightened awareness of what is possible and what doesn’t work anymore. As employees are being asked to go back into the office, they are realizing not only that they don’t want to go back, but also they don’t want to go back to that same old job.

Does this resonate with you?

If so, the one thing I caution you against is taking on another job without making sure that it is absolutely going to be the right one for you. Let’s make sure you aren’t jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire!

To avoid that, let’s work together and make a plan.

Here are the steps that you can take to start understanding what's next for you:

Step 1: Get clear on why you are leaving your current job. Is it the responsibilities? The people? The lack of a challenge? The culture? Does it not match what you envision for yourself… or something else?

Step 2: Look back at your career and see if it can guide you towards what to do next. What skills have you gained along the way? What problems have you had success in solving? Look back at least five years to find your answers. You will have an easier time going forward if you can build on and draw from where you’ve already been.

Step 3: Create a hybrid format resume pulling the accomplishments from your chronological resume where you have demonstrated the skills from step 2. This format highlights your skills and accomplishments and deprioritizes your previous job titles.

Step 4: Research roles that require the use of your skills starting in your industry or parallel ones. Note: Changing industries are more challenging than changing jobs within your existing industry.

Step 5: Find people who work in the jobs you’ve identified and connect with them.  Try to learn about the role, responsibilities, the type of problems they are solving, the skills needed to do the job well, and the challenges you can anticipate.

These 5 steps will help you get started in the right direction of finding what you want to do next.

The key to success in changing roles is in the relationships you build with people you meet along the way

There’s a lot to do here, and it’s not hard to get frustrated or feel lost. If you truly want to make a change, consider working with a Career Coach to help guide you through the process and keep you on the right track!

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Why & How to Use LinkedIn Even When You Do Have a Job

Use LinkedIn when you have a job

Why & How to Use LinkedIn Even When You Do Have a Job

August 9, 2021

Use LinkedIn when you have a job

Many career professionals only use LinkedIn when they are looking for a new job. I think this is a big mistake!

When you step away from active networking on LinkedIn, you stop growing and nurturing your online network. You miss out on opportunities to stay informed about your industry and current market trends.

You also lose important ground. If you stay connected, you keep yourself in the right position to put your network to work as soon as possible. A job loss often comes with no warning. Maintaining your online network is an important buffer that can reduce the amount of time you spend between jobs.

And what if you decide to look for a job but you want to stay at your current one until you find it? If you are already active on LinkedIn, your online activity won’t raise any red flags with your current employer because you are always active.

When my clients find new jobs, they often tell me: “I am going to keep networking!” I would like to tell you that many do but unfortunately that’s not true. Most people get involved in their jobs and don’t make the time in their new schedule for.

LinkedIn is the ideal place to keep your network alive while you are working.

...and it doesn't have to take too much of your time either!

Here are three things that I recommend you do on LinkedIn every single week, even if you have a job:

  1. Every day before you begin your workday, go to your LinkedIn home page and notification section and engage with your connections.
  2. Schedule between 1-3 virtual coffee chats each month with people you want to get to know better. Don’t just stick to people you already know. Also connect with people who seem to industry connectors or appear to be the someone “in the know.”
  3. Find a LinkedIn group related to your industry that is active. Look for groups that have regular posts and members who are commenting and sharing information. This can be a way for you to become a subject matter expert (aka an SME) and bring your expertise to the group.

If you do these three things each week, you will keep your network alive. When you need help with your next job search, your network will be ready and willing to help because you have stayed connected.

Finding time to keep your network alive while you are employed is challenging. But building and maintain your relationships is key to your career success. Being active on LinkedIn will keep you visible with your network and it could lead to a new job even if you were not looking for one.

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Looking for a Job? Do This Every Day on LinkedIn.

Do this every day on linkedin

Looking for a Job? Do This Every Day on LinkedIn.

July 26, 2021

Do this every day on linkedinYou’ve already heard about the importance of using LinkedIn for your job search.

Some job seekers think that having an “All-star” rating on their profile is enough.  It is a good start, but it’s not enough. If you are not actively engaging with your network, then you are invisible.

Recruiters and Hiring Managers are on LinkedIn looking for talent every single day.  If you want to be found by them, you need to be visible to a broad network.

Based on my experience working with thousands of job seekers, here are the top three things you must-do on LinkedIn every day that will help you be seen by the right people:

  1. Work toward having 500 connections. The broader your network is, the more people will become aware you are in job transition. This increases your chances of knowing someone in one of your targeted companies who can refer you to a job opening.
  2. Visit your LinkedIn home page every day and also check your notifications. These are the two places where you can engage with your #1 and #2 connections. Think of these areas as where your online networking happens. Talk with your connections, share articles, get a sense of what’s trending… and keep an eye out for people talking about job openings. Yes, you should also check out the jobs section, but that actually isn’t your first stop. When people in your network are talking about openings and opportunities, you can step into an active conversation with the key people involved.
  3. Actively engage with your connections. Reply to people you are following and comment on articles posted by companies you are targeting. Use a balance of likes, comments, and shares. Just liking a post will not give you the visibility you need in your search. Commenting, however, allows you to share your perspective and develop new relationships. Sharing is a form of goodwill and will show your connections you are thinking of them, which in turn might have them think of you. People will go to your profile because you have showed up on their notifications.

Quick tip: When you comment or share, tag the original poster or the person you are replying to (using the @ and their username). This will increase your visibility!

LinkedIn is an essential part of your job search. If you use the steps above every single day, you will become visible to the people who can help you find the job you’re looking for!

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